24 August 2012

Logical Thinking: Reason & Reality


Does reality require an observer?

Any answer to this question requires an observer to observe the answer.

Because an observer is always required to observe an answer, no question can be answered and not be observed.

Therefore, it is impossible to answer the question: "Does reality require an observer?"

Unanswerable questions cannot be solved with reason.

Therefore, reason cannot solve the nature of reality.

4 comments:

Peter McCombs said...

Agreed.

Dave McCombs said...

I did not expect that.

I'm going to rename it and post it public!

I came up with this randomly some time after taking Philosophy 1250 - Logical Thinking and learning about sound and valid arguments.

Peter McCombs said...

I mostly agree with the statement, "unanswerable questions cannot be solved with reason." Unanswerable questions are unanswerable because they lack some quantifiable aspect. A fundamental truth can only be assumed, upon which reason then builds. But there are many such possible truths.

I would say that reason alone is insufficient at answering most questions, if we are interested in the facts. The ultimate nature of being is subject only to speculation, in which reason plays an important part in revealing possibilities.

Dave McCombs said...

You wrote: "A fundamental truth can only be assumed, upon which reason then builds." This seems significant -- does it have any relation to A priori and A posteriori? It seems a little bit different.

Then you write: "The ultimate nature of being is subject only to speculation, in which reason plays an important part in revealing possibilities."

But what if you were to shorten your sentence: "The ultimate nature of being is subjective." ?

I'm all for reason of course. I just feel that at some point it becomes a limitation -- an important limitation for producing materialization according to a specific language -- but otherwise a limitation, and a barrier that prevents knowing. Reason must allow for ultimate uncertainty, and nothing can ever be truly known.